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Cambridge University Presentation

 In Gary Mabbutt Blog

I was privileged to have been invited to do a presentation on Sports and Diabetes to students at Cambridge University, one of the most renowned Universities in the world.

I was invited by the Cambridge University Sports and Exercise Medicine Society (SEMsoc), I was a little nervous at presenting to some of the most elite academics, but I delivered my presentation last night followed by a Q&A and all seemed to go well.

My presentation was based on my experiences of living with Diabetes for the last 37 years and how I managed the condition during my career as a Professional Sportsman at the highest level.

I took the students through the differences of Diabetes management from when I was first diagnosed back in 1978, when the needles were the size of a knitting needle and you were only given one needle that had to be used for a week, and stored in surgical spirit after each use to keep it sterilised! There was no such thing as blood testing and the only way to get an idea of your sugar levels was through doing a urine test, where you had to collect your urine and dip a stick into the urine to give you some idea of where your blood sugars were.

Whilst I was researching for the presentation, it came home to me how much easier living with Diabetes is now to how it was then, we now either use the finest needles for one injection only, or have an insulin pen, that is so easy to use, or even a pump that is attached to the body that automatically injects insulin throughout the day and you top it up at meal times.

People often ask about the problems that I encounter having to now take seven injections every day, but it sounds a lot worse than it really is, after taking around 55,000 injections over the 37 years, injecting is now like brushing your teeth, with the occasional sore one !!

Diabetes is a condition that as long as you look after yourself, you can lead a normal life, but the possible complications of the condition in later life, blindness, kidney failure and amputations are always concerning, and this is why the care and treatment for all diabetics must be paramount in the health services agendas.

The President of the Cambridge University Sports and Exercise Medicine Society, Sarah Goldhill posted this comment;

Thank you to those who came and a massive thank you to Gary Mabbutt for being a truly wonderful speaker. He regaled us with numerous brilliant stories from a golden time in football and is a real inspiration – even if you have adversity / set-backs / have to break the mould you can still achieve your dreams through hard work and perseverance (and sometimes a bit of luck helps too!). Thank you Gary Mabbutt!

Have a good week I was privileged to have been invited to do a presentation on Sports and Diabetes to students at Cambridge University, one of the most renowned Universities in the world.

I was invited by the Cambridge University Sports and Exercise Medicine Society (SEMsoc), I was a little nervous at presenting to some of the most elite academics, but I delivered my presentation last night followed by a Q&A and all seemed to go well.

My presentation was based on my experiences of living with Diabetes for the last 37 years and how I managed the condition during my career as a Professional Sportsman at the highest level.

I took the students through the differences of Diabetes management from when I was first diagnosed back in 1978, when the needles were the size of a knitting needle and you were only given one needle that had to be used for a week, and stored in surgical spirit after each use to keep it sterilised! There was no such thing as blood testing and the only way to get an idea of your sugar levels was through doing a urine test, where you had to collect your urine and dip a stick into the urine to give you some idea of where your blood sugars were.

Whilst I was researching for the presentation, it came home to me how much easier living with Diabetes is now to how it was then, we now either use the finest needles for one injection only, or have an insulin pen, that is so easy to use, or even a pump that is attached to the body that automatically injects insulin throughout the day and you top it up at meal times.

People often ask about the problems that I encounter having to now take seven injections every day, but it sounds a lot worse than it really is, after taking around 55,000 injections over the 37 years, injecting is now like brushing your teeth, with the occasional sore one !!

Diabetes is a condition that as long as you look after yourself, you can lead a normal life, but the possible complications of the condition in later life, blindness, kidney failure and amputations are always concerning, and this is why the care and treatment for all diabetics must be paramount in the health services agendas.

The President of the Cambridge University Sports and Exercise Medicine Society, Sarah Goldhill posted this comment;

Thank you to those who came and a massive thank you to Gary Mabbutt for being a truly wonderful speaker. He regaled us with numerous brilliant stories from a golden time in football and is a real inspiration – even if you have adversity / set-backs / have to break the mould you can still achieve your dreams through hard work and perseverance (and sometimes a bit of luck helps too!). Thank you Gary Mabbutt!

Have a good week

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